Orchestrating Change by Canton Symphony Orchestra
Episode 11 - The Staff Reflects

Episode 11 - The Staff Reflects

March 19, 2021

This episode will conclude our first season of Orchestrating Change. Our hosts, Rachel Hagemeier and Matthew Jenkins Jaroszewicz, reflect with Michelle Charles and Nathan Maslyk about how the podcast has affected them since it was first conceptualized last year. They discuss important lessons they have learned along the way, what they hope to accomplish in the future, and their favorite moments from Season 1.

Thank you to everyone who has watched and listened this first season. We are incredibly grateful for your support and open ears as we navigate Canton Symphony Orchestra towards a brighter future of inclusiveness, equity, and diverseness in a field that has not always been. We are excited for the future and how we can better serve the Stark County community and beyond. Orchestrating Change is available wherever you get your podcasts. Go to www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change/ to sign-up for email reminders, view past episodes, and see the various channels where you can view our content.

For more information about everything else we are offering at this time, please visit www.cantonsymphony.org.

Episode 10 - A Rich History with Eric Gould

Episode 10 - A Rich History with Eric Gould

March 12, 2021

This week’s discussion is with pianist, composer and educator Eric Gould. We discuss the history of non-white composers and he shares his own story as an African-American composer. As a person from a family of composers, Gould is able to give unique perspective to what it means to be a part of orchestral music as a non-white person and educates us on the rich history of composers of color.

Eric Gould has enjoyed a multifaceted career as a pianist, composer, arranger, and educator. He has performed and recorded in collaboration with world-renowned instrumentalists such as Jimmy Heath, Ron Carter, James Newton, Bobby Watson, Antonio Hart, Winard Harper, Cindy Blackman, Terri Lynne Carrington, Cecil Bridgewater, Robin Eubanks, and Leon Lee Dorsey in addition to leading his own trio in performances from the Midwest to the East Coast. His debut CD, “On the Real”, rose to number 11 on the national jazz radio charts in the first quarter of 1999. His second CD, “Miles Away… Wayne in Heavy” rose to number 10 on the national charts and to number 45 (out of over 2500 releases) for the year 2000 His third CD, “Who Sez?” sold well from coast to coast, and appeared on radio playlists nationally.

Patrons who wish to sign-up for email reminders may do so at www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change. More information, including additional episodes, will be released in our weekly newsletter and social media accounts. https://www.cantonsymphony.org/episode-10-eric-gould/

https://youtu.be/IJ0kXMH0GgM

Episode 9 - The Modern Musicain with Angie Haze

Episode 9 - The Modern Musicain with Angie Haze

March 5, 2021

Trigger Warning: This episode contains content discussing sexual assault and domestic abuse. Viewer discretion is advised.

In this episode of Orchestrating Change we step outside the world of orchestral music to look at the music industry at large. Frequent guest artist with the Canton Symphony, Angie Haze, discusses the difficulties for independent musicians and the shift to online performance. What does it take for someone to become successful in this industry and why is cross genre support important to the survival of all genres of music?

Award Winning Singer Songwriter, Angie Haze is a multi-instrumentalist, composer and producer. Her latest sound is evocative and experimental with a new, creep-pop appeal. Riveting and poignant, it features haunting vocal arrangements and diverse instrumentation. Haze fearlessly uncovers her viability as a way to enlighten and connect people. Her story of survival never fails to influence change. Angie Haze’s gritty performance features five-part vocal arrangements and a wide variety of musicians. Her band represents commonality that reflects the voices of distinct cultures. They clearly demonstrate compassion and a bond necessary to continue.

Patrons who wish to sign-up for email reminders may do so at www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change. More information, including additional episodes, will be released in our weekly newsletter and social media accounts. https://www.cantonsymphony.org/episode-9-angie-haze/

https://youtu.be/iWyOa7W98bw

Episode 8 - Pulling Back the Curtain on Diversity with Julian Maddox

Episode 8 - Pulling Back the Curtain on Diversity with Julian Maddox

February 26, 2021

In today’s episode, Julian Maddox shares his own experience as a young musician of color in the orchestral world. We discuss what it really takes to bring about truly diverse programming on and off the stage and unpack “the canon” of orchestral music. This discussion gives us a glimpse into what work really needs to be done to bring inclusion and equity to our stages and musical institutions.

Canton Symphony Orchestra knows the need for change within the orchestral community. The tradition of classical music has ignored many communities that have contributed to the development and canon of repertoire played in the concert hall. While Canton Symphony is a regional orchestral, change starts at the smallest level. With “Orchestrating Change”, the Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to facilitate conversations that will make the concert hall a more welcoming place for previously ignored communities as well as create more acceptance and diversity on the stage.
 

In addition to Orchestrating Change internally, educating audiences to issues surrounding diversity and inclusion will be a priority. Music by Black, Latinx, female, Asian, and LGBTQAI+ musicians and composers has been noticeably absent in the programming produced by established institutions in comparison to those who are white and male. Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to be a more welcoming community that is reflective of the demographics in Canton, Ohio and the surrounding major metropolitan areas.

Patrons who wish to sign-up for email reminders may do so at www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change. More information, including additional episodes, will be released in our weekly newsletter and social media accounts.

 

https://youtu.be/eIVEtcB50ZA
 
https://www.cantonsymphony.org/episode-8-julian-maddox/
Episode 7 - The Past Informs the Future with Gerhardt Zimmermann

Episode 7 - The Past Informs the Future with Gerhardt Zimmermann

February 19, 2021
 
Today on Orchestrating Change, we are joined by Music Director of the Canton Symphony Orchestra, Gerhardt Zimmermann. He shares his story as a physically disabled conductor through his long and prosperous career. We also discuss his views on the orchestral industry and what issues he has seen from the perspective of the music director. How has the industry changed and what can long standing professionals do to push the industry forward?
 
Canton Symphony Orchestra knows the need for change within the orchestral community. The tradition of classical music has ignored many communities that have contributed to the development and canon of repertoire played in the concert hall. While Canton Symphony is a regional orchestral, change starts at the smallest level. With “Orchestrating Change”, the Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to facilitate conversations that will make the concert hall a more welcoming place for previously ignored communities as well as create more acceptance and diversity on the stage.
 

In addition to Orchestrating Change internally, educating audiences to issues surrounding diversity and inclusion will be a priority. Music by Black, Latinx, female, Asian, and LGBTQAI+ musicians and composers has been noticeably absent in the programming produced by established institutions in comparison to those who are white and male. Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to be a more welcoming community that is reflective of the demographics in Canton, Ohio and the surrounding major metropolitan areas.

Patrons who wish to sign-up for email reminders may do so at www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change. More information, including additional episodes, will be released in our weekly newsletter and social media accounts.

 

https://youtu.be/HqyhuBCTWLk
 
https://www.cantonsymphony.org/episode-7-gerhardt-zimmermann/
Episode 6 - Shades of Possibility with JoAnn Falletta

Episode 6 - Shades of Possibility with JoAnn Falletta

February 12, 2021

Today on Orchestrating Change, GRAMMY award-winning conductor, JoAnn Falletta, spoke with us about her journey to become one of the first female music directors of a major American orchestra and where she sees the future of orchestral music going. Her passion for the orchestra flowed through this conversation and made it very clear to us why she was able to shatter the glass ceiling of conducting. 

JoAnn Falletta serves as Music Director of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Music Director Laureate of the Virginia Symphony Orchestra, Principal Guest Conductor of the Brevard Music Center and Artistic Adviser of the Hawaii Symphony Orchestra and the Cleveland Institute of Music Orchestra. Hailed for having ‘Toscanini’s tight control over ensemble, Walter’s affectionate balancing of inner voices, Stokowski’s gutsy showmanship, and a controlled frenzy worthy of Bernstein’, she is a leading force for the music of our time.

Canton Symphony Orchestra knows the need for change within the orchestral community. The tradition of classical music has ignored many communities that have contributed to the development and canon of repertoire played in the concert hall. While Canton Symphony is a regional orchestral, change starts at the smallest level. With “Orchestrating Change”, the Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to facilitate conversations that will make the concert hall a more welcoming place for previously ignored communities as well as create more acceptance and diversity on the stage.

In addition to orchestrating change internally, educating audiences to issues surrounding diversity and inclusion will be a priority. Music by Black, Latinx, female, Asian, and LGBTQAI+ musicians and composers has been noticeably absent in the programming produced by established institutions in comparison to those who are white and male. Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to be a more welcoming community that is reflective of the demographics in Canton, Ohio and the surrounding major metropolitan areas.

Patrons who wish to sign-up for email reminders may do so at www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change. More information, including additional episodes, will be released in our weekly newsletter and social media accounts.

https://www.cantonsymphony.org/episode-6-joann-falletta/

Episode 5 - Leading the Change with Marie-Hélène Bernard

Episode 5 - Leading the Change with Marie-Hélène Bernard

February 5, 2021

Today on Orchestrating Change, Marie-Helene Bernard guides us through a conversation about what it means to be a leader in the field of orchestral music. She speaks on her experience as both a female and an immigrant and how that has affected her leadership style and her view on the future of this field. She is dedicated to equity, diversity and inclusion in her organizations and strives to create an inclusive environment in her organizations so the future of orchestral music is more diverse and representative of the communities we serve.

Canton Symphony Orchestra knows the need for change within the orchestral community. The tradition of classical music has ignored many communities that have contributed to the development and canon of repertoire played in the concert hall. While Canton Symphony is a regional orchestral, change starts at the smallest level. With “Orchestrating Change”, the Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to facilitate conversations that will make the concert hall a more welcoming place for previously ignored communities as well as create more acceptance and diversity on the stage.

In addition to Orchestrating Change internally, educating audiences to issues surrounding diversity and inclusion will be a priority. Music by Black, Latinx, female, Asian, and LGBTQAI+ musicians and composers has been noticeably absent in the programming produced by established institutions in comparison to those who are white and male. Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to be a more welcoming community that is reflective of the demographics in Canton, Ohio and the surrounding major metropolitan areas.

Patrons who wish to sign-up for email reminders may do so at www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change. More information, including additional episodes, will be released in our weekly newsletter and social media accounts.

https://www.cantonsymphony.org/episode-5-marie-helene-bernard/

Episode 4 - Navigating the Unknown with Michelle Charles

Episode 4 - Navigating the Unknown with Michelle Charles

February 5, 2021

On today’s episode we discuss Michelle Charles’ career path and how she has navigated unexpected developments as the Executive Director of the Canton Symphony. What does an orchestral organization do when faced with events like COVID-19, racial injustice and the me too movement? What is the responsibility of the orchestra and how can the orchestra push to orchestrate change to create a more diverse and inclusive future?

Michelle has been President & CEO since 2011. Previously serving in all capacities of the organization as chorus member and volunteer, board trustee and staff, she continues to be a driving force behind the increasing notoriety of the Canton Symphony.  Michelle holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Music History and Theory from Hiram College, where she graduated summa cum laude. Michelle is currently the Past President of the Rotary Club of Canton and District Governor Nominee Designate for Rotary District 6650 and is a Paul Harris Fellow.  She is currently serving on the boards of The Friends of the Summit (91.3 FM) where she serves as Treasurer, and the Leadership Stark County Alumni Board. She was a member of the 27th Class of Leadership Stark County, and is currently a member of Woman’s Impact, Inc. In 2016, she was chosen to be a part of the Sisters of Charity Leadership Forum and is a member of Malone University’s President’s Advisory Council. In 2012, she was honored to be named one of the Twenty Under 40 and in 2018 was inducted to the YWCA of Stark County’s Women’s Hall of Fame.

Canton Symphony Orchestra knows the need for change within the orchestral community. The tradition of classical music has ignored many communities that have contributed to the development and canon of repertoire played in the concert hall. While Canton Symphony is a regional orchestral, change starts at the smallest level. With “Orchestrating Change”, the Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to facilitate conversations that will make the concert hall a more welcoming place for previously ignored communities as well as create more acceptance and diversity on the stage. In addition to orchestrating change internally, educating audiences to issues surrounding diversity and inclusion will be a priority. Music by Black, Latinx, female, Asian, and LGBTQAI+ musicians and composers has been noticeably absent in the programming produced by established institutions in comparison to those who are white and male. Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to be a more welcoming community that is reflective of the demographics in Canton, Ohio and the surrounding major metropolitan areas.

Orchestrating Change is available on all platforms, including Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, and PodBean. Patrons who wish to sign-up for email reminders may do so at www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change. More information, including additional episodes, will be released in our weekly newsletter and social media accounts.

Episode 3 - Exploring Gender, Expanding Music Scholarship with Destinee Siebe

Episode 3 - Exploring Gender, Expanding Music Scholarship with Destinee Siebe

January 22, 2021

In this episode of Orchestrating Change, we discussed issues of gender, sexuality, and representation through the lens of musicology. Destinee Siebe shared their own journey of self-discovery and how that has impacted their research and view of the history of classical music. How does diverse representation affect a listener? Where has diverse representation been present in music history and ignored and how do we commit to authentic representation in the future of classical music? All that and more, this week on Orchestrating Change.

Destinee N. Siebe (she/her/hers or they/them/theirs) is a student musicologist, set to complete the Historical Musicology M.A. program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in spring 2021. She is a graduate of Baldwin Wallace Conservatory, where she majored in Music History & Literature and studied bassoon with Mr. Jonathan Sherwin. In addition to her work with the Canton Symphony Orchestra this season, she has also been an invited speaker at graduate student conferences in the U.S. and Canada, as well as for events sponsored by the Baldwin Wallace Friends of the Conservatory organization. Her research interests are best described as “all things 20th and 21st century United States,” ranging from feminist archive strategies and understudied women composers, to the 21st century wind ensemble’s responses to tragedies and violence.

Orchestrating Change is available on all platforms, including Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, and PodBean. Patrons who wish to sign-up for email reminders may do so at www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change. More information, including additional episodes, will be released in our weekly newsletter and social media accounts.

Episode 2 - Transition: The Power of Authenticity with Sara Davis Buechner

Episode 2 - Transition: The Power of Authenticity with Sara Davis Buechner

January 15, 2021

In today’s episode, Sara Beuchner takes us through her journey as a transgender woman and shares how her relationship with the orchestral community changed when she decided to transition. She educated us on the intolerance that still exists towards the transgender community and shared how she has navigated that bias and still managed to be an extremely successful concert pianist.

Sara Davis Buechner is one of the leading concert pianists of our time. She has been praised worldwide as a musician of “intelligence, integrity and all-encompassing technical prowess” (New York Times). Japan’s InTune magazine says: “When it comes to clarity, flawless tempo selection, phrasing and precise control of timbre, Buechner has no superior.”

Canton Symphony Orchestra knows the need for change within the orchestral community. The tradition of classical music has ignored many communities that have contributed to the development and canon of repertoire played in the concert hall. While Canton Symphony is a regional orchestral, change starts at the smallest level. With “Orchestrating Change”, the Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to facilitate conversations that will make the concert hall a more welcoming place for previously ignored communities as well as create more acceptance and diversity on the stage. In addition to orchestrating change internally, educating audiences to issues surrounding diversity and inclusion will be a priority. Music by Black, Latinx, female, Asian, and LGBTQAI+ musicians and composers has been noticeably absent in the programming produced by established institutions in comparison to those who are white and male. Canton Symphony Orchestra hopes to be a more welcoming community that is reflective of the demographics in Canton, Ohio and the surrounding major metropolitan areas.

Orchestrating Change is available on all platforms, including Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music, and PodBean. Patrons who wish to sign-up for email reminders may do so at www.cantonsymphony.org/orchestrating-change. More information, including additional episodes, will be released in our weekly newsletter and social media accounts.

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